Beware of ‘fitness’ influencers who don’t know how to lose weight safely Beware of ‘fitness’ influencers who don’t know how to lose weight safely
If you are looking for a place to get weight loss tips, Instagram might not be the place to search for it – this... Beware of ‘fitness’ influencers who don’t know how to lose weight safely

If you are looking for a place to get weight loss tips, Instagram might not be the place to search for it – this is according to research. To date, you will notice that a number of influencers claiming to be health and fitness enthusiasts give advice about how to lose weight or promoting weight loss supplements. The thing is, they seem not to know what they are talking about.

In the United Kingdom, it was found out that only one out of the nine most popular weight loss bloggers shared substantial and factual tips. It was mentioned that the majority of the blogs cannot be considered credible and that these presented opinions as facts. This is dangerous given that blogs have a wide reach.

The results don’t come as a surprise given that social media pages and blogs are not regulated thoroughly. Writers can freely share their opinion regardless if it is strongly based on evidence.

when do you believe a fitness influencer

How can you know that you are following a credible influencer?

Are they backing up their claims with science?

When they are promoting something, are they just reading what’s on the label, or do they provide in-depth information about it? Are they citing scientific evidence or just sharing hearsays?

Are they even credible enough to share information?

One of the things you can do is to have a bit of research about the influencer. Is he or she credible enough to provide weight loss advice? Are they accredited by different institutions? Or are they simply using their influence to promote a product and earn a lot of money?

A fitness influencer promoting a dangerous weight loss pill

In 2018, Michelle Lewin, a popular fitness influencer with millions of followers, was criticized for promoting pills which are meant to ‘crush carbs’. This didn’t sit well with other fitness experts knowing that such drugs can be dangerous. It isn’t even backed up with scientific evidence and as we all know, losing weight doesn’t have short cuts. We can clearly see the danger here because as someone who’s big online, with a body chiseled to ‘perfection’, a lot of people might believe her.

What are the weight loss scams that people believed in the past

A shapewear that can reduce extra fats and cellulite

The company claimed that their shapewear was infused with retinol, caffeine, and other ingredients that promote weight loss.

Slimming powder to be sprinkled on your food

The product promised that you can lose 30 pounds just by sprinkling the powder on your food. It claimed that users will immediately feel full and thus will eat less.

Cream which is lobster-inspired

They also called this a ‘shrinking cream’ which promised to improve the appearance of cellulite and can help you lose extra pounds. To date, they have included a note in their product description that says ‘not intended for weight loss‘.

The bottom line here is – when you see things online, don’t immediately believe it, most especially if it is associated with health. You have to do more research and to see if experts would promote such products and tips. And again, if you want to lose weight, work hard for it.

Barbara

Barbara

Barbara is a young mother of 2 adorable kids whom she enjoyed playing with. She started living healthy when she realized that she has to keep up with her kids' energy. On her free time, she writes, sings, and tries to cook pancake for her children.

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